Old Quotes From the British Press

“Cult cabaret artist Ernesto Tomasini’s extraordinary castrato operatic voice”

The Line of the Best – 10 July 2012

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“Ernesto Tomasini’s perfect counter-tenor”

The Pandorian – March 2012

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“Featuring the stunning, expressive range of Ernesto Tomasini. Tomasini’s voice embraces both cabaret and theatre with ease. (…) Tomasini’s expansive range is given full flight (…) Tomasini’s voice soars, switching between falsetto and softly-spoken”

Compulsion online – January 2012

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“Ernesto Tomasini lets out a majestic, frightening, other-worldly operatic wail. He keens and croons, sending his voice spiralling around the room like an unquiet spirit. He stands (…) striking attitudes as if an unholy alliance of Grace Jones and Maria Callas is fighting over his soul. He’s a bizarre but commanding presence – and yet the sheer strangeness of the spectacle doesn’t detract from an unexpected emotional pull. There’s some weird transcendence at work here. [It is] something strangely, indefinably, moving”

Nemesis To Go – December 2011

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“Ernesto’s appearance on the music video [of “Last Night I Paid to Close My Eyes”] is all at once striking, ostentatious and enigmatic – an element of whimsy to go with the theatrics of it all”

Brainwashed – 27 November 2011

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“Ernesto Tomasini, dressed in a long, blood-red gown filled the room with his beautiful operatic vocals.”

London Fashion Week – 18 September 2008

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“A most extraordinary voice”

Heathen Harvest – August 2008

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“A voice that is gender changing and at times almost androgynous”

Compulsion Online – 2008

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“Italian cult performer Ernesto Tomasini’s vocal range is uncanny; he sings both the English and Italian parts, in tenor and falsetto, respectively, and sounds for all the world like two separate people.”

ReGen Magazine – 25 July 2007

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“[The show] is the brainchild of versatile actor and singer Ernesto Tomasini, who with his extraordinary singing voice and puckish physical elegance manages to condense the unspoken legacy of gay cinema into just over an hour without foregoing honesty, spontaneity or humour. Tomasini dances, sings and laughs through the best part of a century”

The Stage – 22 April 2006

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“Tomasini camps it up from start to finish with an array of hysterical characters. The sketches pay homage to everything from The Sound of Music to Psycho and he rattles through them with dexterity. His ear for accents, his excellent singing voice and the exuberance with which he mocks the egos of film stars underpins his ingenious humour. Even audience participation becomes an exciting treat. (…) [High praise for] the slickness of Tomasini’s delightful performance and of the production itself.

H&H – 14 April 2006

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“Ernesto Tomasini returns to the Drill Hall in a clever, bittersweet, one-man ‘musical extravaganza’ written and performed by Tomasini himself (…) He manages to pull off some very funny, as well as touching, poignant moments. (…) Tomasini proves to be an incredibly talented, versatile performer. He convincingly brings to the stage a range of memorable moments from film (…) history”

Gay.com UK – 5 November 2005

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“A voice in drag”

Time Out – 16/23 April 2003

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“Tomasini, a falsetto singer himself who can reach the heights with gusto, uses the story to provide us with a medley of opera hits and even the odd music hall song,(…) the comedy and tragedy in the story [are] both moods apt for Tomasini’s face, which is a weird hybrid of Buster Keaton paper-like expressionlessness and camp Peter Sellers cheekiness”

Time Out – 9/16 April 2003

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“With a four-octave range, cult Italian countertenor Ernesto Tomasini could not have found a better vehicle to show off his many talents. (…) One part cabaret performer, one part Simon Schama and one part operatic quick-change artist, he is never less than riveting throughout the show”

What’s On – 9 April 2003

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“Ernesto Tomasini has an amazing singing voice of four octaves; his countertenor range has a strength and beauty well suited to the operatic arias included in the show (…) And alongside the otherwise entirely classical repertoire came the music hall song, ‘Waitin’ at the Church’, complete with broad Cockney accent – no mean feat for an Italian guy from Sicily! (…) Ernesto’s performing career has been a varied one, covering theatre, cabaret and concert hall. In this show he combines all three, and keeps the audience entranced throughout. (…) Ernesto has cult status as a cabaret performer, and I can well understand why – he is flamboyant, versatile, energetic, fascinating to watch and a joy to listen to, both singing and speaking. (…) Ernesto is the besto!”

The British Theatre Guide – 8 April 2003

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“Startling and outrageous”

The Daily Mirror – 4 April 2003

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“Such a charismatic, emotional performer. An extraordinarily powerful voice. When he sings high, the visceral, otherworldly sound is as close as a modern singer can get to the sound of the male sopranos. Surreal”

What’s On – 2 April 2003

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“One gets the impression that the voice and personality of this one-man show’s star, Ernesto Tomasini, could fill a football stadium if they had to. For just over an hour he is actor, storyteller, history teacher, comedian and cantor to a privileged and appreciative audience. He plays a voice, the falsetto, and illustrates its European history with arias, which span five centuries and the four octaves of his own remarkable voice. (…) Tomasini does not let us forget the melancholic dignity of his operatic heroes. But his irreverence, and the energetic performance (…), made us laugh more than we cried. (…) And his voice shakes the room with its rendition of the castrato sound, exploring its capacities to be human or un-natural, florid or pure, grotesque or beautiful. This is undoubtedly a show of contradictions – tragicomic, brutal yet tender, blending the high camp of the stage with that of the church. It is hilarious, moving, educational and a definite must-see”

Gay.com UK – 28 March 2003

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“Multi-talented, utterly engaging Ernesto Tomasini teaches us about the castrati. (…) His singing is a joy, his characterization superb and his enthusiasm catching. (…) An absolute delight”

The List – 15/22 August 2002

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“Ernesto Tomasini has, by any standards, a remarkable voice. It spans 4 octaves and can deliver a powerful falsetto in his upper register. He is perfect (…) He tells the story with flair, wit and a few moments of brilliant, soaring musical illustration”

The Stage – 15 August 2002

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“The most important and wonderful aspect of this show is Tomasini’s voice. He manages to provide a remarkable rendition of castrato-style singing which is both exquisite and strangely eerie”

Edinburgh Guide – August 2002

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Ernesto Tomasini gives a wonderful performance: it is flamboyant, but also quietly communicates the sadness at the story’s heart. His falsetto voice captures the chimerical sound of the castrati with eerie accuracy”

The Guardian – 12 August 2002

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“Amazing Tomasini!”

The Guardian – 5 August 2002

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“His flamboyant singing is most startling”

Time Out – 20/27 February 2002

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“The famous castrato-style performer whose high falsetto can plummet to deep baritone with startling effect”

The Evening Standard – 15 February 2002

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“An opera professional, he is the piece de resistance”

The Face – December 2001

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“Maria Callas meets Marcel Marceau”

The Scotsman – 22 October 2001

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“Ernesto is pretty outrageous – he wears a leotard, tights, heels and has a high voice”

The Sunday Times Magazine – 7 February 1999

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“An impressive, reverberating range. His vocal cavortings bring to mind the operatic qualities of the castrati”

The Scotsman – 15 August 1998

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“He makes quite an impression for he oozes personality and demonstrates an impressive vocal range”

The Stage – 9 July 1998

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“The comic cabaret talents of Ernesto Tomasini”

The Evening Standard – 10 June 1998

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“Superb”

Liverpool Daily Post – 21 November 1996

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“Owner of a remarkable voice”

Oxford Mail – 6 November 1996

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“Possessor of a remarkable voice”

The Oxford Times – 6 November 1996

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“An amazing vocal range”

Evening Argus – 5 November 1996

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“An excellent voice”

The Stage – 10 October 1996

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“An amply characterful voice, a banshee falsetto”

The Independent – 7 October 1996

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“A remarkable voice”

The Financial Times – 2 October 1996

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“An outstanding voice, an imposing presence”

The Sunday Times – 27 August 1995